Renewable Energy Ecology

Steven M. Grodsky, PhD

27. Moorman, C. E., S. M. Grodsky, and S. P Rupp (Eds.). 2019. Renewable Energy and Wildlife Conservation. Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore. [LINK]

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26. Hernandez R. R., A. Armstrong, J. Burney, G. Ryan, K. Moore-O'Leary, I. Diédhiou, S. M. Grodsky, L. Saul-Gershenz, R. Davis, J. Macknick, D. Mulvaney, G. A. Heath, S. B. Easter, M. K. Hoffacker, M. F. Allen, and D. M. Kammen. 2019. Techno-ecological synergies of solar energy produce beneficial outcomes that mitigate global environmental change. Nature Sustainability. 2:560–568. [PDF]

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25. Grodsky, S. M., L. S. Saul-Gerschenz, K. A. Moore-O’Leary, J. P. Whitney, and R. R. Hernandez. 2019. Hare don’t care! Consumption of a rare, desert milkweed containing phytochemicals by the black-tailed jackrabbit. Journal of Arid Environments. DOI:10. 1016/j.jaridenv.2019.103991. [PDF]

24. Cope, G. C., J. W. Campbell, S. M. Grodsky, and J. D. Ellis. 2019. Evaluation of nest-site selection of ground-nesting bees and wasps (Hymenoptera) using emergence traps. The Canadian Entomologist. doi:10.4039/tce.2019.3. [PDF]

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23. Campbell, J. W., S. M. Grodsky, D. Halbritter, P. Vigueira, C. Vigueira, O. Keller, and C. H. Greenberg. 2019. Asian needle ant (Brachyponera chinensis) and woodland ant responses to repeated applications of fuel reduction methods. Ecosphere. 10(1):e02547. 10.1002/ecs2.2547. [PDF]

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22. Murphy-Mariscal, M., S. M. Grodsky, and R. R. Hernandez. 2018. Solar energy development and the biosphere. Pp. 387-401 in A Comprehensive Guide to Solar Energy Systems. T. Letcher and V. Fthenakis (eds.). Elsevier. [PDF]

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21. Campbell, J. W., S. M. Grodsky, O. Keller, C. Vigueira, E. Waite, P. Vigueira, and C. Greenberg. Response of beetles (Coleoptera) to repeated applications of prescribed fire and other fuel reduction techniques in the southern Appalachian Mountains. Forest Ecology and Management. 429:294-299. [PDF]

Blue Ridge Mountain Physiographic Province, North Carolina. Photo credit: Dennis Oakley.

Blue Ridge Mountain Physiographic Province, North Carolina. Photo credit: Dennis Oakley.

20. Grodsky, S. M., J. W. Campbell, S. R. Fritts, T. B. Wigley, and C. E. Moorman. 2018. Variable responses of non-native and native ants to coarse woody debris removal following forest bioenergy harvests. Forest Ecology and Management. 427:414–422. [PDF]

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19. Grodsky, S. M., C. E. Moorman, S. R. Fritts, J. W. Campbell, M. A. Bertone, C. E. Sorenson, S. B. Castleberry, and T. B. Wigley. 2018. Invertebrate community response to coarse woody debris removal for bioenergy production from intensively managed forests. Ecological Applications. 28:135–148. [PDF]

Featured in:  NC State News

18. Fritts, S. R., C. E. Moorman, S. M. Grodsky, D. W. Hazel, J. A. Homyack, C. B. Farrell, and S. B. Castleberry. 2017. Rodent response to harvesting woody biomass for bioenergy production. Journal of Wildlife Management.  DOI: 10.1002/jwmg.21301. [PDF]

17. Grodsky, S. M., K. A. Moore-O’Leary, and R. R. Hernandez. 2017. From butterflies to bighorns: Multi-dimensional species-species and species-process interactions may inform sustainable solar energy development in desert ecosystems. Proceedings of the 31st Annual Desert Symposium (R. L. Reynolds, Ed.). California State University Desert Studies Center. Zzyzx, CA. April 14-15, 2017. [PDF]

A queen butterfly ( Danaus gilippus ) caterpillar feeding on Mojave milkweed ( Asclepias nyctaginifolia ) at Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System - one of the world's largest concentrating solar facilities - Mojave Desert, USA. Photo by Steve Grodsky.

A queen butterfly (Danaus gilippus) caterpillar feeding on Mojave milkweed (Asclepias nyctaginifolia) at Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System - one of the world's largest concentrating solar facilities - Mojave Desert, USA. Photo by Steve Grodsky.

16. Virzi, T., J. L. Lockwood, R. G. Lathrop, Jr., S. M. Grodsky, and D. Drake. 2017. Predicting American oystercatcher breeding distribution in an urbanized coastal ecosystem using Maximum Entropy Modeling. Waterbirds (American Oystercatcher Special Issue) 40:104–122. [PDF]

Living the dream working as an AMOY field technician in New Jersey, USA. #therealJerseyShore. Photo by Tom Virzi.

Living the dream working as an AMOY field technician in New Jersey, USA. #therealJerseyShore. Photo by Tom Virzi.

15. Virzi, T., J. L. Lockwood, D. Drake, S. M. Grodsky, and T. Pover. 2016. Conservation implications of reproductive success of American Oystercatchers in an urbanized barrier island complex. Wader Study DOI:10.18194/ws.0004 [PDF]

Newborn American Oystercatcher ( Haematopus palliatus ) chick found on a dredge spoil island, New Jersey, USA. Photo by Steve Grodsky.

Newborn American Oystercatcher (Haematopus palliatus) chick found on a dredge spoil island, New Jersey, USA. Photo by Steve Grodsky.

14. Grodsky, S. M., C. E. Moorman, S. R. Fritts, S. B. Castleberry, and T. B. Wigley. 2016. Breeding, early-successional bird response to forest harvests for bioenergy. PLoS ONE  11 (10): e0165070. doi.10.1371/journal.pone.0165070. [PDF]

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13. Grodsky, S. M., C. E. Moorman, S. R. Fritts, D. W. Hazel, J. A. Homyack, S. B. Castleberry, and T. B. Wigley. 2016. Winter bird use of harvest residues in clearcuts and the implications of forest bioenergy harvest in the southeastern United States. Forest Ecology and Management 379:91–101. [PDF]

Our study suggested that mourning dove ( Zenaida macroura ) may eat seeds 'dammed up' against coarse woody debris and therefore associate with harvest residues for feeding following woody biomass harvests in intensively managed pine plantations in North Carolina, USA. Photo by Tom Prestby.

Our study suggested that mourning dove (Zenaida macroura) may eat seeds 'dammed up' against coarse woody debris and therefore associate with harvest residues for feeding following woody biomass harvests in intensively managed pine plantations in North Carolina, USA. Photo by Tom Prestby.

12. S. M. Grodsky, C. E. Moorman, and K. R. Russell. 2016. Forest wildlife management. Pp. 47-85 in Ecological Forest Management Handbook. G. LaRocque (Ed.). Taylor Francis Group/CRC Press. [LINK]

"Bachman’s sparrow is a specialist bird species that benefits from multi-scale conservation efforts that encourage large and connected patches of fire-maintained longleaf pine forest with lush groundcover of native grasses and forbs." Photo by Alexander Fish.

11. Fritts, S. R., C. E. Moorman, S. M. Grodsky, D. W. Hazel, J. A. Homyack, S. B. Castleberry, K. H. Pollock, and C. B. Farrell. 2016. Can biomass harvesting guidelines sustain herpetofauna following harvest of logging residues for renewable energy? Ecological Applications 26:926–939. [PDF]

Black racer ( Coluber constrictor ), a commonly encountered snake in harvested pine forests of the southeastern United States. Photo by Paul Taillie.

Black racer (Coluber constrictor), a commonly encountered snake in harvested pine forests of the southeastern United States. Photo by Paul Taillie.

10. Grodsky, S. M., R. B. Iglay, C. E. Sorenson, and C. E. Moorman. 2015. Should invertebrates receive greater inclusion in wildlife research journals? Journal of Wildlife Management 79:529–536. [PDF]

*Ranked in the top 5% of articles shared across social media by Altmetric; inspired the Editor’s Message “What Taxa are Appropriate for the Journal?” [PDF] in the May 2015 issue of JWM

Invertebrates are wildlife. Wood cockroach photo by Chase Kimmel.

Invertebrates are wildlife. Wood cockroach photo by Chase Kimmel.

9. Fritts, S. R., S. M. Grodsky, D. W. Hazel, J. A. Homyack, S. B. Castleberry, and C. E. Moorman. 2015. Quantifying multi-scale habitat use of woody biomass by southern toads. Forest Ecology and Management 346:81–88. [PDF]

A southern toad ( Anaxyrus terrestris ) equipped with a radio antenna. Photo by Sarah Fritts.

A southern toad (Anaxyrus terrestris) equipped with a radio antenna. Photo by Sarah Fritts.

8. Fritts, S. R., C. E. Moorman, S. M. Grodsky, D. W. Hazel, J. A. Homyack, C. B. Farrell, and S. B. Castleberry. 2015. Shrew response to variable woody debris retention: implications for sustainable forest bioenergy. Forest Ecology and Management 336:35–43. [PDF]

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7. Drake, D., C. S. Jennelle, J. N. Lui, S. M. Grodsky, S. Schumaker, and M. Sponsler. 2015. Regional analysis of wind turbine-caused bat mortality. Acta Chiropterologica 17:179–188. [PDF]

Part of one of a cluster of three wind facilities in southeastern Wisconsin, USA. Photo by Steve Grodsky.

Part of one of a cluster of three wind facilities in southeastern Wisconsin, USA. Photo by Steve Grodsky.

6. Fritts, S. R., S. M. Grodsky, and C. E. Moorman. 2014. Managing woody debris to sustain wildlife populations following woody biomass harvests. Southeastern Partnership for Integrated Biomass Supply Systems. [PDF]

Harvested pine forest following clearcutting and woody biomass harvest in Georgia, USA. Photo by Steve Grodsky.

Harvested pine forest following clearcutting and woody biomass harvest in Georgia, USA. Photo by Steve Grodsky.

5. Grodsky, S. M., C. S. Jennelle, and D. Drake. 2013. Bird mortality at a wind-energy facility near a Wetland of International Importance. The Condor: Ornithological Applications 115:700–711. [PDF]

Search transects in a corn field at a wind energy facility in southeastern Wisconsin. Photo by Tom Underwood.

Search transects in a corn field at a wind energy facility in southeastern Wisconsin. Photo by Tom Underwood.

4. Grodsky, S. M., C. S. Jennelle, D. Drake, and T. Virzi. 2012. Bat mortality at a wind-energy facility in southeastern Wisconsin. Wildlife Society Bulletin 36:773–783. [PDF]

Silver-haired bat ( Lasionycteris noctivagans ) found dead under a wind turbine in southeastern Wisconsin, USA. Photo by Tom Underwood.

Silver-haired bat (Lasionycteris noctivagans) found dead under a wind turbine in southeastern Wisconsin, USA. Photo by Tom Underwood.

3. Grodsky, S. M. & D. Drake. 2011. Bird and bat mortality at the Forward Energy Center in southeastern Wisconsin. Reference #152052. Public Service Commission of Wisconsin. [PDF]

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2. Grodsky, S. M., M. J. Behr, A. Gendler, D. Drake, B. D. Dieterle, R. J. Rudd, and N. L. Walrath. 2011. Investigating the causes of death for wind turbine-associated bat fatalities. Journal of Mammalogy 92:917–925. [PDF]

*Media coverage: Nature (in Correspondence, Vol. 288), Renewable Energy Magazine, Wisconsin State Journal, Minneapolis Star Tribune, UW – Madison Environmental Communications

Radiograph of a dead bat collected under a wind turbine. The compound fracture in the wing is indicative of direct collision with turbine blades. Radiograph taken by Nicole Walrath.

Radiograph of a dead bat collected under a wind turbine. The compound fracture in the wing is indicative of direct collision with turbine blades. Radiograph taken by Nicole Walrath.

1. Garvin, J. C., C. S. Jennelle, D. Drake, and S. M. Grodsky. 2011. Response of raptors to a windfarm. Journal of Applied Ecology 48:199–209. [PDF]

Red-tailed hawk ( Buteo jamaicensis ) flying near the pad of a wind turbine in southeastern Wisconsin, USA. Photo by Tom Underwood.

Red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis) flying near the pad of a wind turbine in southeastern Wisconsin, USA. Photo by Tom Underwood.